Author and speaker 

Nicholas Boothman

 

More than 600 corporations, thousands of small businesses, and six of the world’s leading business schools know the better you are at connecting and communicating face-to-face with all kinds of different people, the faster you’ll pull ahead of the competition.

That’s why they contacted Nicholas Boothman.

If you’ve ever been on the subway or in an elevator or at the gym you know the rules.

Don’t make eye contact, Stay as far away from other people as you can, and whatever you do, don’t talk to strangers.

But what if the rules are wrong?

Coming Soon!

Talking to strangers isn’t just the right thing to do. It’s a matter of survival.

The stats are staggering.

On May 1, 2018 – the global health service company Cigna released results from a national survey exploring the impact of loneliness in the United States. The survey of more than 20,000 U.S. adults aged 18 years and older revealed some alarming findings:

  • 47 percent of Americans report sometimes or always feeling alone or left out
  • 27 percent rarely or never feel as though there are people who really understand them
  • 43 percent sometimes or always feel that their relationships are not meaningful and that they are isolated from others
  • 20 percent admit to having no close friends
  • 19 percent of seniors live alone and over 40 percent report feeling lonely on a regular basis
  • generation Z, adults ages 18-22,  is the loneliest generation 

And it’s not limited to the US. 50 percent of the population of Paris now live alone, 60 percent of the population of Stockholm live alone and 31percent of the entire United Kingdom live alone. 

It’s time for a change.

Whatever we want in this life—a dream job, a fresh circle of friends or tickets to the FA cup final—chances are we’ll need a stranger’s help to get it. To understand this is to recognize one of life’s simple truths: life doesn’t happen without talking to strangers. 

It has never been more important to talk to strangers than it is today. Polarized politics, political correctness and digital distractions are pushing us apart and making strangers out of all of us. The result is an epidemic of confusion, isolation and loneliness across all age and socio-economic groups.

Nicholas Boothman’s new book Talk to a Stranger Today – A Survivor’s Guide to an Unlonely Life, challenges readers to tackle loneliness and realize their true vitality by connecting with the ocean of opportunities swirling all around them every day. 

In just thirty days Nicholas Boothman will have you meeting new people and finding lucky breaks – without feeling awkward.

“Training the New York SuperCops includes daily discussions on the works of Aristotle, George Orwell and Nicholas Boothman” – THE NEW YORKER

“Nicholas Boothman is truly inspirational” – THE ECONOMIST MAGAZINE

“Boothman is Dale Carnegie for a rushed era.” – THE NEW YORK TIMES  

Make instant meaningful connections for interviewing, selling, making friends, pitching ideas and feeling confident

For retail, front-line, healthcare and support personnel, individuals, associations and students of all ages who want to make trusting, human connections with other people. 

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Best Sellers

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MAKE TRUSTING CONNECTIONS AND GET YOUR POINT ACROSS, FOR MANAGING, SELLING, PITCHING AND INSPIRING LOYALTY AND COOPERATION.

“Success in business depends on effectively communicating ideas, at least as much as thinking them up, and Boothman tells us how to do that. This book shows how to turn instant connections into long-lasting, productive business relationships. —Matthew Bishop, The Economist Magazine.

CAPTIVATE ANY AUDIENCE, PITCH AND PRESENT IDEAS, PROBLEM SOLVE, INSPIRE LOYALTY, LEAD CHANGE AND OPEN HEARTS IN LIFE AND BUSINESS

Research shows StorySpeakers earn more, out-perform, do better in school and college, get hired and promoted faster and get better service in person and over the phone than fact-speakers.

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